author: Krasimir Tsonev

Hi there, I'm . Senior front-end engineer with over 13 years of experience. I write, speak and occasionally code stuff. Follow me on Twitter, GitHub, Facebook or LinkedIn

chrome

Web Highlights #2

Some of the cool and helpful things which I found in the net.

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Chrome extension: debugging dev tools tab or how to make console.log

It's really interesting to work on an extension for Chrome. However, sometimes it's a little bit difficult to debug. Especially when you work on a dev tools add-on (i.e. a new tab).

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Auxilio Chrome extension presentation at VarnaLab

Last month I'm working on my own extension for Chrome. It adds two things - a much simpler new tab page and fully working interactive console. The command prompt is actually added in the DevTools panel.

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Testing responsiveness

We all know what responsive means nowadays. We, as developers, normally develop responsive applications. There is a dozen of instruments helping us achieving our goals. Some of us use extensions and even pay for them. However, I'm using one thing - Google Chrome browser. In this article, we will see what the Chrome's capabilities for testing responsiveness are.

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Sorry, Chrome killed the terminal

That's right. I'm not using the terminal anymore. Instead of that I'm using Chrome. Yes, the Google's browser. There is an extension called Yez! that connects to a Node.js module via web socket. It executes the shell commands and returns the result. And even works under Windows.

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Developing Node.js applications with Google Chrome

Google Chrome is my favorite browser. I'm spending a big part of my working hours there, so it makes sense to use it for everything. Last week I posted "Sorry, Chrome killed the terminal". The article was about Yez!, an extension that brings terminal-liked functionalities to the browser. Today, I'll show you how I use Chrome in my Node.js development workflow.

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Meet Evala - your terminal in the browser

On my machine I have four applications always open - VSCode, Chrome, iTerm and Slack. I spend most of my time in Chrome and VSCode. My editor is full with awesome extensions and I feel pretty good there. What I am doing for the browser is making sure that I have fewer tabs open and install only extensions that I really use. One thing though I can achieve so far. I can't find the perfect new tab extension.

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